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Communities don't have to reinvent the wheel. The Blueprint is built to help.

THE IMPLEMENTATION WHITE PAPER OFFERS GUIDANCE FOR AN EFFECTIVE PLANNING PROCESS

Communities need answers.

 

That's what inspired us to find, analyze and curate the best ideas from existing COVID recovery plans, in partnership with the University of Oregon Institute for Policy Research & Engagement and input from experts. 

  • The Blueprint is a free, open source planning tool for every community that puts those best practice ideas for community-centered crisis recovery into one place, with a special focus on supporting vulnerable populations hit hardest by the pandemic.

 

  • The implementation white paper contains analysis and instruction for adapting the Blueprint to local needs through community-powered problem solving.

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SIX CORE PRINCIPLES FOR RECOVERY PLANNING

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1.  ASSET-BASED MINDSET

What can we do with the assets (people, programs, policies, practices) we already have on hand? This strengths-based approach prioritizes an abundance mentality over a scarcity mentality. 

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2. RECOVERY FOR ALL, WITH A FOCUS ON THE MOST VULNERABLE

In facilitating community recovery, which assets can help the people and economic sectors most disproportionately impacted?

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3. RELATIONALLY-DRIVEN

How can the planning process build and deepen relational connections that increase social capital? This includes creating spaces for a diverse collective to brainstorm breakthrough recovery strategies that foster community resilience.

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4. TIME BOUND

The environment is changing rapidly; early recovery plans should be time bound. The Blueprint is designed to enable community leaders to select a subset of initial priorities, but to revisit those priorities every six months.

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5. ACTION ORIENTED

What priority actions need to be taken first, given the assets we have identified, the affected populations, and key stakeholders?  

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6. ITERATIVE

How can we quickly make decisions and take actions now, but remain adaptable over time? Agile methodology uses rapid iterations of “think-do” cycles so that recovery plans evolve alongside our collective knowledge, experience, and leadership capacity.

Thank you to the following individuals whose review and feedback improved the Blueprint! 

Andrew Smith and Gregory Wolf, County Solutions, Association of Oregon Counties

Marc Lipsitch, MD,  Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Marlene Putman, JD Health & Human Services, Tillamook County, Oregon

Eric Toner, MD & Tener Veenema, RN, PhD; Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security

Various team members, National Governor's Association, Center for Best Practices

Brian Park, MD, Oregon Health and Science University

Amy Bradbury, Allison Camp, Mimi Kato, and Matt Sayre, University of Oregon